Tyrrell Winston Presents ‘Tiger Stripes’ at Cranbrook Art Museum

Tyrrell Winston Presents 'Tiger Stripes' at Cranbrook Art Museum

Tyrrell Winston has been quietly perfecting his game. Well-known for his gridded assemblages made of found basketballs, the Detroit-based artist has ventured across a number of new studies, including collectible editions, large-scale paintings, along with a custom Reebok Question Mid and Club C 85.

Following his Hail Mary solo exhibition at Library Street Collective, Winston concurrently is showcasing his first museum solo show at Cranbrook Art Museum in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. “I’ve been a lifelong sports fan, but when I started making art, seriously, I never really envisioned that I would treat sport as a medium,” said Winston in an interview.

The latest show, Tiger Stripes, takes its name from the fact that every tiger has its own unique set of stripes, which for the artist, has been used as a metaphor to describe the unique identity, pride, and legacy many feel about their favorite sports team.

The exhibition presents a series of new Protection Paintings, which juxtapose lacquered panels of metallic automotive paint and found discarded tarps. Several of the paintings serve as a homage to Michigan sports through colors that evoke the Detroit Lions, University of Michigan and their bitter rivals, Michigan State University.

Tiger Stripes is on view at Cranbrook Art Museum until September 25.

For more on art, we spoke to Nadia Lee Cohen for the latest Through the Lens.

Cranbrook Art Museum
39221 Woodward Ave,
Bloomfield Hills, MI 48304

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Tyrrell Winston Presents 'Tiger Stripes' at Cranbrook Art Museum

Jaime Muñoz Releases ‘Self Portrait’ via Avant Arte

Jaime Muñoz Releases 'Self Portrait' via Avant Arte

Jaime Muñoz is a Pomona-based artist who creates multi-layered compositions that reflect the Southern California iconography that raised him. Car culture, which is ever-present across the state, is of particular interest to Muñoz, who uses the vehicle to examine class, race and identity.

Made in conjunction with Avant Arte, the artist has released a new limited-edition print dubbed Self Portrait. Prominently centered in the middle of the work is a gold chromatic pickup truck that is overlaid with distorted facial features in a monochromatic color palette. “Some of the themes that I’m interested in are involved with labor, specifically how those values influenced the worker experience — coming from my personal experience on the other end of that hierarchy, I always felt obligated in some way to make those narratives more visible,” said Muñoz in an interview.

Based on an original painting, Self Portrait is an edition of 35 and comes with added features, such as velvet flocking and glitter details applied by hand. The print will be available to purchase via Avant Arte for $1,259 USD on September 7 at 9am ET.

Elsewhere, we spoke with Nadia Lee Cohen for the latest Through the Lens.

Click here to view full gallery at HYPEBEAST

Jaime Muñoz Releases 'Self Portrait' via Avant Arte

Louis De Guzman Releases an Ambient Lamp Sculpture

Louis De Guzman Releases an Ambient Lamp Sculpture

Louis De Guzman has shown a steady interest in sculpture as of late. Having recently partnered with his hometown Chicago Cubs on a permanent statue at Wrigley Field, Guzman follows up with a new limited-edition sculpture titled DETACHED.

The new work is more than just a standalone art piece and serves as fully-functioning lamp that emits ambient light that you can control via remote. “This piece was created with the intention to allow an individual to have direct curated and functional control of their personal space and environment,” said De Guzman in a statement. “To grasp the depicted moods and disruptive chaos that surrounds the unison of the elevated sphere, each ambient light setting balances both a still life with depicted emotion based on the atmosphere that the work presently sits in. To control your own chaos and detach from what used to be, to make room for what’s to come.”

Standing at 11-inches tall, the sculpture is made from metal alloy, polyethylene, and PVC — with geometric shards wrapping around an etched orb. DETACHED is an edition of 500 and will be available to purchase for $450 USD on August 13 at 5:30pm PT.

Click here to view full gallery at HYPEBEAST

Louis De Guzman Releases an Ambient Lamp Sculpture

Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen

Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen

Through The Lens spotlights emerging and established photographers from around the world. The ongoing series is dedicated to offering unique insights in varying areas of photographic expertise including portrait, landscape, fine art, fashion, documentary and more.

Nadia Lee Cohen is not a pragmatist, nor does she use words like ‘magic’ when describing her own work. But there is something clearly surreal in the way she’s able to frame the ordinary.

In the past decade, the London-born, Los Angeles-based artist has ascended up the art world like few have in recent memory — directing music videos for A$AP Rocky and Kali Uchis, global shoots for Gucci and Balenciaga, releasing several books with IDEA and more.

Seeing the hyper-stylized scenes she creates, it would surprise many to learn that Cohen grew up on a rural farm in the U.K. In hindsight, it allowed her “to be a child for longer,” as her imagination “wasn’t interrupted,” she told HYPEBEAST.

Having attended the London College of Fashion, Cohen cites Martin Parr, Cindy Sherman and Larry Sultan as some of the many inspirations who opened her eyes to the humor within the seemingly mundane occurrences of daily life. Similarly, Alfred Hitchcock and David Lynch show influence on Cohen, whose work is at once eerie, voyeuristic and spellbinding.

Although she states that there are “no overt messages” she’s trying to convey — the questioning of beauty and identity show to be a constant throughout her career.

Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen

Cohen finds glamour in the mundane and socially ‘ugly’ corners of the world — real or fictitious. She takes it one step further by injecting a sense of surrealism in her subjects — from four-armed sunbathers to a three-breasted bodybuilder who’s clearly spent too much time at the tanning salon.

Back on the topic of books, Cohen released Women in 2020 — a six-year survey of contemporary womanhood as shown through 100 nudist portraits. Last year, she worked with IDEA on another title, HELLO, My Name Is…, which presents a series of 33 characters that Cohen created from the nametags of unknown people. The inspiration for the book came from an In-N-Out badge that a teenage boy named Jesus gave to her on Easter.

At first, she didn’t really know what to do with the tags, but upon collecting more and more at charity shops and flea markets, Cohen started to imagine the life of these characters by connecting them to the obejects she’d collect.

There is, for example, Teena, the Marlboro Red-smoking Jane Birkin fan; Ivett, the melancholic casino dealer and Cohen’s personal favorite, Jeff, the self-assured bolo-tie wearing cowboy.

In short, HELLO, My Name Is… is a masterclass in photography and styling, as it is in storytelling and transformation. Housed at Jeffrey Deitch Gallery in Los Angeles, the British artist brought both her last two books to life through an incredibly immersive exhibition featuring video and film installations, along with blown-up portraits of the characters she’d imagined and the conveyer belt of objects that formed them.

For those in LA, be sure to check out the show as it ends tomorrow, August 13. Meanwhile, check out the full Through The Lens interview with Cohen below.

Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen

“I remember the first time I saw an episode of Ren & Stimpy in the early 90’s and it completely blew my mind.”

How would you describe your childhood?

Feral, muddy, rainy, cozy. I grew up on essentially a building site / farm in the English countryside that my parents were doing up. It was sandwiched between masses of green grass, cornfields, haystacks and dense woodland. I spent most days covered in mud searching for fossils, freeing trapped pheasants or helping rabbits blinded with myxomatosis. I think it allowed me to be a child for longer as my imagination wasn’t interrupted.

Can you recall your earliest memories of art?

I don’t think this counts but I remember the first time I saw an episode of Ren & Stimpy in the early 90’s and it completely blew my mind.

Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen

“I really suffer with ‘grass is greener’ syndrome when I’m in either place.”

Was photography and film clear to you as a career path when you were younger?

Not at all, I had no clear direction of what I wanted to do even up until around the age of 16. Still confused, I enrolled in a course called ‘fashion portfolio’ at the London College of Fashion; which is essentially a little bit of everything until you whittle away at the career paths you have no hope in. I ended up with ‘styling and photography’ and one day my tutor said ‘you can’t do both, you have to pick one’ so I picked photography and that was that.

Moving from the UK to LA, how would you describe your new home? Does it live up to your expectations or let you down?

I really suffer with ‘grass is greener’ syndrome when I’m in either place. I obviously have a love for both, the UK is my reality and LA is my hyper-reality. I have to leave both often and to travel in order to avoid becoming blind to what they each mean to me.

Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen

“I am into things that were triggered by those initial inspirations, almost like a spider diagram.”

What would you say some of your biggest inspirations were in your formative years and today?

I had a boyfriend in my teens who taught me a lot about punk culture and underground movies that I would have had no idea about if I hadn’t gotten into that relationship, shoutout to Nick! Now I am into things that were triggered by those initial inspirations, almost like a spider diagram.

Do you have a dream project or film that you would love to star in or direct?

I do, it just doesn’t exist yet, but hopefully it will soon.

Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen

“Objects are so important in my photographs.”

Often times when we watch a film, there’s a clear distinction between what is real and what is fantasy — in terms of the world we live in and the worlds depicted on screen. However, if one were to step back and watch their own lives through a film, we would begin to view our social structure along with the the seemingly mundane phenomena as bizarre. What is your approach to framing the world and what messages do you aim to convey?

I love putting a big bright theatrical spotlight onto the things we may consider as boring or familiar. There’s no overt ‘messages’, it’s just my own sense of humor and point of view.

How about your current exhibition at Jeffrey Deitch. What was the process like from earliest concept to execution?

I have wanted to exhibit for a long time, I’d spent the last seven years creating two photo books that were never intended to be viewed on a small scale. Women was essentially a project of film stills from movies that don’t exist. The specific details within those images like toast popping, a dead plant or a mysterious background character were intentionally placed in the scene and are only really noticeable when being viewed on a larger scale. Similarly with HELLO, My Name Is…, the details such as the texture of the skin, prosthetic hands, individually placed eyebrow hairs or tiny purple thread-veins really only stand out when an 80×60” portrait is looking down at you.

Objects are so important in my photographs, so when I found out the exhibition was going ahead Jeffrey and I had a conversation about the importance of this ‘not feeling like a photo show’. This was exactly the kind of encouragement I needed to consider ways that I could bring physicalities from the photographs to life. These took the form of a piece of breeze block wall from The Valley, a rotating dry cleaning and airport conveyor belt, dirty cinema seats sticky with chewing gum, a miniature motel featuring a tiny male character watching hours of cartoons. Also Carole from the book Women melting on a sun lounger and Jeff, my favorite character from HELLO, My Name is… sitting as a permanent visitor of the gallery.

The execution of this new work was probably the most challenging. It was becoming increasingly stressful and financially intimidating to realize all of the ideas, but once I had them I really didn’t want to compromise and lose anything. I put everything I had into the show and genuinely have no regrets in doing so.

Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen
Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen

“It’s so impressive when something beautiful can be created out of nothing, that’s real talent.”

Is there a particular subject or theme that interests you at the moment?

Anything that looks great and is cheaply made, grindhouse style. It’s so impressive when something beautiful can be created out of nothing, that’s real talent. Brian De Palma once said in an interview that ‘visual storytelling has gone out of the window’. He was referring to the dark digital movies made today and how the narrative seems to have overridden the visuals. I’m interested in noticing artists who push against this and bring back the importance of visuals to their work.

How would you define beauty?

Having character and not being boring.

What excites and scares you the most about the world today?

I’m excited by the future; what I’m going to make and the people I’m going to meet. I’m scared for the future of the environment. I was on set last week and literally everything was wrapped in plastic, plastic cups, plastic forks, plastic knives, plastic containers, plastic wrapped masks. The sanitary officer was spraying chemicals near the food to make it ‘sanitary’. This over-cautious attempt to deflect us from getting sick is scary to me as it seems like a short-sighted attitude towards the bigger picture that we are totally fucking up our environment.

Photos: Joshua and Charles White. Courtesy of Nadia Lee Cohen and Jeffrey Deitch.

Read more at HYPEBEAST

Through the Lens: Nadia Lee Cohen

Andy Warhol’s Relatives Will Auction Rare Artwork From His College Years

Andy Warhol’s Relatives Will Auction Rare Artwork From His College Years

Relatives of Andy Warhol look to sell rare artworks that the Pop-Artist created during his college years. As first reported by ARTnews, a group of family members led by James Warhola — Warhol’s nephew, who is also an artist and illustrator based between Pittsburgh and Upstate New York — will auction 10 unique works all created during his uncle’s college years at Carnegie-Mellon University (formerly known as Carnegie Institute of Technology) from 1945 to 1949.

James and his siblings had inherited the work from his late parents, Anne Warhola and Paul Warhola (Andy’s brother), who passed away in 2014 and 2016 respectively. “I believe these paintings will do well, but the painting Nosepicker 1 is the real prize,” said Richard Polsky, a Warhol historian in an interview with Artnet News. “That’s because it’s probably Andy Warhol’s first self-portrait. Even though it’s not considered part of his mature work, it’s a historically significant indicator of his future fascination with painting his own likeness.”

None of the artworks have an estimate price as of yet, but Polsky added that “the works will be modestly estimated to encourage bidding.”

Elsewhere in the news, Martine Syms presents the first season of She Mad at MCA Chicago.

Click here to view full gallery at HYPEBEAST

Andy Warhol’s Relatives Will Auction Rare Artwork From His College Years

Martine Syms Presents the First Season of ‘She Mad’ at MCA Chicago

Martine Syms Presents the First Season of ‘She Mad’ at MCA Chicago

Humor, grit and contemplation is a hallmark of Martine Syms‘ practice. Born and based in Los Angeles, Syms is interested in how social, cultural, economic and psychological forces begin to shape one’s perception of self and the outside world. Although she works across a range of mediums, video is the bedrock of her practice and the focus of her ongoing She Mad series.

For the first time, Syms is featuring She Mad in its entirety in a new solo exhibition at MCA Chicago. The project takes the form of a semi-autobiographical sitcom of a young female artist who is trying to make it in LA. Inspired by a number of sources, including early cinema, TV shows and meme culture, Syms investigates the ways in which the Black experience has been portrayed through the screen.

On view are five video artworks set against an immersive sculptural installation constructed from exposed aluminum and Syms’ signature color purple for the backdrop. The hue is symbolic in that it references both the chroma key backdrops used in post-production and Alice Walker’s 1982 novel, The Color Purple.

Made in conjunction with Bergen Kunsthall, Martine Syms: She Mad Season One is on view at MCA Chicago until February 12, 2023.

For more on art, check out our latest Studio Visit with Inés Maestre.

MCA Chicago
220 E Chicago Ave,
Chicago, IL 60611

Click here to view full gallery at HYPEBEAST

Martine Syms Presents the First Season of ‘She Mad’ at MCA Chicago

ALLCITY Presents ‘STILL LIFE’ by Vaughn Taormina

ALLCITY Presents 'STILL LIFE' by Vaughn Taormina

ALLCITY has steadily cemented itself as a gallery that should be on your radar. Founded by Doubleday & Cartwright, the burgeoning space has already featured a number of emerging artists, including Nikkolos Mohammed and Martin Kazanietz.

The latest to join the list is Detroit-based artist and musician, Vaughn Taormina. Bold, graphic and direct — Taormina paints his compositions in a way that feels faithful to the city that raised him. On view are 11 new paintings which act as dioramas and love letters to the city of Detroit — “From Worldstar HipHop to Cooper Union I’m out here touchin grass,” said the artist in a statement.

Having opened back in March, ALLCITY looks to champion a diverse roster of artists who share a bold and unapologetic vision of contemporary culture, by pushing boundaries, bucking trends and driving movements. STILL LIFE by Vaughn Taormina is on view in Brooklyn until August 31.

Elsewhere, Pipilotti Rist visualizes the neurons in our brain in new installation.

ALLCITY
85 Metropolitan Ave.
Brooklyn NY, 11249

Click here to view full gallery at HYPEBEAST

ALLCITY Presents 'STILL LIFE' by Vaughn Taormina

‘Ulysses’ Dream’ Is a New Group Exhibition Inspired by ‘The Iliad’

‘Ulysses’ Dream’ Is a New Group Exhibition Inspired by 'The Iliad'

Ulysses’ Dream is a new group exhibition that transforms Fondation Carmignac into a labyrinth of art. Inspired by Homer’s ancient Greek poem The Iliad, the show presents a disorienting maze of corridors where visitors are faced with a decision: “take this path or turn their back on it, see one work and not another.”

Guest curated by Francesco Stocchi, the exhibition invites audiences on an introspective journey accompanied by an extraordinary range of artwork and motifs, including work from John Baldessari, Jenny Holzer and Jean-Michel Basquiat to Olafur Eliasson, Gerhard Richter, Cindy Sherman and many more.

Located on the Mediterranean island of Hyères, the exhibition is amongst the same light, sea, trees and caves as in Homer’s mythic tale. To accompany the exhibition, Editions Dilecta has published a catalog that documents the work on display, along with text and essays by Stocchi, Achille Bonito Oliva and Paula Burleigh.

Ulysses’ Dream is on view until October 16. See the full list of exhibiting artists below.

For more on art, ALLCITY presents STILL LIFE by Vaughn Taormina.

Fondation Carmignac
Villa Carmignac, Porquerolles
Île de Porquerolles
La Courtade
83400 Hyères

Exhibiting Artists:

Micol Assaël
John Baldessari
Miquel Barceló
Jean-Michel Basquiat
Marinus Boezem
Louise Bourgeois
Mark Bradford
Francesco Clemente
Adger Cowans
Willem de Kooning
Niki de Saint Phalle
Olafur Eliasson
Haris Epaminonda
Leandro Erlich
Urs Fischer
Cyprien Gaillard
Douglas Gordon
Duane Hanson
Keith Haring
Camille Henrot
Jenny Holzer
Thomas Houseago
Rashid Johnson
William Kentridge
Yves Klein
Oliver Laric
Roy Lichtenstein
Adam McEwen
Tony Matelli
Janaina Mello Landini
Bruce Nauman
Marilène Oliver
Jorge Peris
Alessandro Piangiamore
Richard Prince
Benoît Pype
Carol Rama
Ann Ray
Man Ray
Martial Raysse
Odilon Redon
Gerhard Richter
James Rosenquist
Miguel Rothschild
Arcangelo Sassolino
Egon Schiele
Cindy Sherman
Günther Uecker
Willem Adriaan van Konijnenburg
Adrián Villar Rojas
Andy Warhol

Click here to view full gallery at HYPEBEAST

‘Ulysses’ Dream’ Is a New Group Exhibition Inspired by 'The Iliad'