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This Prefab Company in Australia Wants to Be the Tesla of Home Building

this-prefab-company-in-australia-wants-to-be-the-tesla-of-home-building

Dimensions X is laying plans to deliver buyers planet-friendly prefabs that begin with a seamless online shopping experience.

Noticing a void in the market, he partnered with renowned Australian architect and champion of sustainability, Peter Stutchbury, on Dimensions X, a start-up offering responsible, affordable, and architecturally-pleasing pre-crafted homes at the click of a button.

When Oscar Martin was building his home in Bondi Beach, he saw firsthand the pitfalls of traditional construction, including cumbersome delays, unexpected expenses, and excessive waste. When certain prefab elements arrived to the site, they went up in a single day, and he began to wonder why the rest of the house couldn’t be as simple.

After noticing a void in the market, Australian entrepreneur Oscar Martin partnered with architect Peter Stutchbury to start Dimensions X, a company that will soon offer affordable and architecturally pleasing prefab homes.

After noticing a void in the market, Australian entrepreneur Oscar Martin partnered with architect Peter Stutchbury to start Dimensions X, a company that will soon offer environmentally friendly prefab homes that can be ordered online.

Photo by Alejo De Achaval

Immediately, Martin, who is an entrepreneur and cofounder of hit news website Pedestrian TV, started a search for prefab homes that led him to beautiful examples in both Japan and Scandinavia. They were good, he thought, but still lacked in both energy efficiency and aesthetic appeal. Inspired to make something better, he partnered with Australian architect Peter Stutchbury, who’s long been a proponent of sustainable building. Together they created Dimensions X, a home building company that plans to deliver planet-friendly prefabs at the click of a button.

“I want to do what Tesla has done for auto, only with housing,” says Martin, referring to both the experience of buying one of Elon Musk’s cars and the reduced energy impact of driving one.

The 968 square-foot prototype called OM-1 has been shortlisted for the New South Wales Australian Institute of Architects 2022 awards for sustainability and new houses.

The 613-square-foot prototype, called OM-1, is built predominantly of cross-laminated timber.

Photo by Alejo De Achaval

Stutchbury and Martin, along with lead project architect Alejo De Achaval, have since designed the first prototype, OM-1, a roughly 613-square-foot design made of cross-laminated timber (CLT), topped with a flat roof with eaves, and packed with energy-efficient components that make it affordable to build, purchase, and live in. And while buying one won’t be quite as simple as a single mouse click, the experience still promises to be slick.

“We have an online configurator where people can build the homes and see real-time pricing based on decisions made,” says Martin, citing unknown costs as one of his main gripes with traditional building.

Stutchbury, Martin, along with their lead-architect and collaborator, Alejo de Achaval, designed the first prototype, a 968 square-foot space with skylights called OM-1, which has been shortlisted for the New South Wales Australian Institute of Architects 2022 awards for sustainability and new houses.

Stutchbury, Martin, and project architect Alejo De Achaval designed the OM-1 to be modular, meaning buyers will be able to create their own arrangements.

Photo by Alejo De Achaval

See the full story on Dwell.com: This Prefab Company in Australia Wants to Be the Tesla of Home Building