A Punched-Up Brooklyn Townhouse Holds Three New Condos Starting at $1.2M

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Overlay Office turns an 1899 building in South Slope into bright, two-bedroom units that have plenty of graphic flair.

A Punched-Up Brooklyn Townhouse Holds Three New Condos Starting at $1.2M

Walking along a row of turn-of-the-century townhouses on Seventh Avenue in South Slope, Brooklyn, you might think: One of these homes is not like the others.

The ground floor, previously altered by a past owner to make room for a restaurant, was clad in charred wood siding.

The ground floor of 460 Seventh Avenue, previously altered by a past owner to make room for a restaurant, is clad in charred wood siding. On the upper two floors, painted arches reference the arched roofs of the nearby Park Slope Armory—and the building’s previous renovations.

Ryan Lahiff

Completed in 1899, the four-story building is a playful take on tradition. While the brick-clad residence is plainer than the nearby Italianate-style brownstones for which the borough is famous, its architecture is not without decorative touches—such as the carved stone corbels at the edge of its rooftop cornice.

Each of the three units comes with its own outdoor space, including this covered deck on the second floor.

Each of the three units comes with its own outdoor space, including this covered deck on the second floor.

Ryan Lahiff

The building at 460 Seventh Avenue has its masonry painted dark gray, and on the ground floor, its brick facade gives way to shou sugi ban timber cladding. The townhouse’s symmetrical trios of windows have also been interrupted: On the ground floor, there’s a larger expanse of storefront glass, and on the upper two floors, painted arches are deliberately offset from the grid—hence the project’s new name: House Offset.

The renovation retained the brick building's original character, but completely renovated the unit layouts and surfaces, including new white oak floors and stair treads.

The renovation retained the brick building’s original character, but completely renovated the unit layouts and surfaces, including introducing new white oak floors and stair treads.

Ryan Lahill

See the full story on Dwell.com: A Punched-Up Brooklyn Townhouse Holds Three New Condos Starting at $1.2M